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Biochemistry Seminar: Dr. Tracy Johnson (University of California, Los Angeles), "RNA splicing, histone modification, and the coordinated control of gene expression"

4/28/2019 3:54:13 PM

 
Seminar of interest:

Dr. Tracy Johnson (University of California, Los Angeles), "RNA splicing, histone modification, and the coordinated control of gene expression"

Details:

Sponsor: Dr. Auinash Kalsotra, Biochemistry

Location: Charles G. Miller Auditorium (B102 CLSL)

Date: May 3, 2019   12:00 pm  

Contact: Sherry Unkraut, sunkraut@illinois.edu, 217-333-2013

 

2/12/2014

Phys.Org (Douglas, Isle of Man, Feb. 12) -- Ribosomes, the cellular machines that build proteins, are themselves made up of dozens of proteins and a few looping strands of RNA. A new study, reported in the journal Nature, offers new clues about how the ribosome, the master assembler of proteins, also assembles itself. “The ribosome has more than 50 different parts – it has the complexity of a sewing machine in terms of the number of parts,” said University of Illinois physics professor Taekjip Ha, who led the research with U. of I. chemistry professor Zaida Luthey-Schulten and Johns Hopkins University biophysics professor Sarah Woodson. “A sewing machine assembles other things but it cannot assemble itself if you have the parts lying around,” Ha said. “The ribosome, however, can do that. It’s quite amazing.” Also: Bioscience Technology (Feb. 13), ScienceBlog (Feb. 12), Red Orbit.com (Dallas, Feb. 13).